August 2, 2014

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Forty-Eight Years of Skyvue History Come to an End as Old School Demolished

Forty-Eight Years of Skyvue History Come to an End as Old School Demolished

  For 48 years, the brick school building on Hartshorn Ridge named Skyvue served the surrounding community, educating its youth.…

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Beallsville Group Raises $5,900 For Veterans

Beallsville Group Raises $5,900 For Veterans

  The 11th annual Beallsville Remembers All Who Gave poker run was held on Fri., July 25 and Sat., July…

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State, Local Officials Meet With Firefighters to Discuss Eisenbarth Well Pad Fire

State, Local Officials Meet With Firefighters to Discuss Eisenbarth Well Pad Fire

  The fire that took place on June 28 at the Eisenbarth well pad near Hannibal has gotten the attention…

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EPA Report on Eisenbarth Well Pad Fire Released

Released last week was the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) report on the results of the accidental Eisenbarth well pad fire. The report reveals that several chemicals leaked into local streams during the fire and that a total of at least 14,500 aquatic animals were killed as a result.

At the time of the fire, over 16 different chemicals were staged on the well pad. Those materials listed in the report were: diesel fuel, hydraulic oil, motor oil, hydorcholoric acid, cesium-137 sources, hydrotreated light petroleum distillates, terpenes, terpenoids, isoproponal, ethylene glycol, paraffinic solvents, sodium persulfate, tributyl tetradecyl phosphonium chloride and “proprietary components.” Also stated in the report was, “As a result of fire-fighting efforts and flow back from the well head, significant quantities of water and unknown quantities of products on the well pad left the site and entered an unnamed tributary of Opossum Creek that ultimately discharges to the Ohio River.”

Water samples of the runoff found TPH, 2-butanone, acetone, benzene, tehylbenzene, xylenes, toluene, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, phenanthrene, pyrene, phenol and clorides in the water.

On June 29, the day after the fire,  a fish kill was discovered by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife in Opossum Creek and its unnamed tributary. Initial estimates from ODNR had the fish kill at around 70,000, a number that was frequently reported through various local media outlets.

In the days following June 30, a collection was made of the aquatic life that had been found dead in the creeks. By the end of the collection, 11,116 dead fish of 20 different species were found as well as 3,519 crustaceans, seven frogs and 20 salamanders. The collection of the dead wildlife ended on July 5.